Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Coming Full Circle

In my last post, I talked about my new-ish computer set-up. Part of this set-up was a brand-spankin' new word processing program, which was one of the reasons why I had held out for so long.

I liked my old word processor. Sure, it was from the late 1990's (Yes, you read that correctly), but I actually knew how to use it, and I didn't want to exchange it for something new because I hate change.

I am Sheldon. Sheldon is me.


But technology seems to love it (Whatever, technology), so with the new-ish faster computer came the new word processor and my idea to transcribe Book Three.

For those who may not know, Book Three, otherwise known as Full Circle, is my new project, the third intended installment in my fantasy series. Not that I can do anything with it until I actually do something with Second Nature, but sitting around and not writing anything makes me crazier than I already am. Besides, given how long it takes me to actually write a novel, I really should have started years ago.

Anyway, I've been working on Full Circle. My original plan for it fell by the wayside, as my plans often do, so I've been building a new plan, with varying degrees of success. Thus far, this novel has been a combination of plotting and pantsing. Mostly, I've been writing down everything that pops into my head. I have no idea how much of it I'll actually keep (I'm thinking not much), but the new plan is to throw it all against the wall and see what sticks.

I'm getting off track again, as I often do. The point is, at the time I converted to the new computer, I had nearly 60,000 words. No completed chapters—hell, there aren't even any completed scenes. It's just 60,000 words worth of possible plot.

When I get stuck on a scene, one of the ways I attempt to get unstuck is to rewrite it. Meaning, I break out my spiral-bound notebook, choose a pen, and physically write it out, and then as soon as any change (no matter how minor) pops into my head, I write it down and follow it to the end. Often, it ends up some place pretty damn good.

Which is why I thought I'd try it with all of Full Circle.

It didn't work out the way I had hoped it would—with me adding a ton more words to the story. Mostly, I just second guessed every plot point I've come up with and went from "I'm so excited to be writing this story at last!" to "How did I manage to screw it all up so quickly?!?"

Doesn't really have anything to do with anything, I know.
I'm just in love with Baby Groot.


Good thing it's a first draft.

So I may not know what it's supposed to be yet, or how to go about writing it, but somewhere in there must be the start of the story I want to tell, right?

Plus, I have plenty of time to figure it out. I still (technically) haven't finished the second book yet.

But that's another post for another day.

Thanks for stopping by, y'all. I'm pretty sure this will end up being my last post for the week, but perhaps I'll be back next week.

Enjoy the rest of your week, and your weekend, everyone!

27 comments:

  1. Oh geez, I'm relating so much right now. (Except I really *shouldn't* be working on my Book 3).
    I'm a fan of writing whatever pops into your head. I feel like I can't stop thinking about a scene until I try to write it. Then I can move on to other things. But it does tend to result in a lot of unfinished scenes and chapters.

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    1. I feel that way, too—that I can't stop or won't stop thinking about a scene until I try to write it. Which is probably why my "Deleted Scene" file is roughly the same size as the book itself. :)

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  2. I hear you, says the person who gave into temptation to start working on book 4 over the weekend while waiting on her publisher to get moving on books 1-3.

    I'm all about pantsing. Writing is scene (or what might become a scene) is the best way I have of getting the wheels rolling. Sure I might delete all of the words later, but if I didn't just start throwing words down, I wouldn't have any fodder to do that magical rewriting step where great things burst forth from the garbage.

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    1. I haven't done this much pantsing in a while. It will be nice to have all that fodder to cannibalize for other scenes once I do figure things out, though.

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  3. Oh no. I like your idea of writing out scenes again, and I'm sorry it's not working out as you'd hoped. If you have someone who you can talk through the plot with, preferably face to face, that can help. They can ask all the daft questions that will make you think about the story you're trying to tell.

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    1. I love talking plot with people; it really works wonders. I haven't really done that with this book. I did talk a little bit about one problem scene with my critique partners, and I'm sure we'll have many more in the future.

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  4. I despise first drafts. Seriously. It's not until the second one that I can unplug my nose and feel a modicum of excitement about what I'm working on. Okay, maybe that's an exaggeration, but not too much of one. I definitely move faster with a plotted outline though, one that my developmental editor occasionally helps with.

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    1. I'm the opposite. I love that first draft because it's new and exciting. The second draft is where I see everything I did wrong, and worry that I'll never get it where I wanted it to be.

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  5. Sometimes first drafts can make me feel no power in the 'verse can stop me. Other times, I want to dig a hole in the ground and bury myself. Keep on pushing through. And I agree with you. I don't like change regarding my word processor. It's why I use LibreOffice. It's simple and updates change so little in it.

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    1. I just went with the new version of Word, because I figured my learning curve would be shorter with a program with which I was at least faintly familiar. The Man thought I should use Google Doc, for the same reasons you use LibreOffice, but I wasn't ready for that much change. :)

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  6. I totally relate. Though I don't write by hand, I do chase ideas to see where they lead! I use yWriter as my writing system of choice. I have dozens of unused scenes that are self-containing, all tucked away for either use later or a memory of what I've cut.

    I hope your new word processor treats you well!

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    1. So far, so good, and I hope it stays that way. It would help make me more receptive to this whole 'change' thing. :)

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  7. So, writing it out and learning a new word processing program (at this point it's probably mostly new to you). That's a good way to keep busy. Good luck.

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  8. Wow. And I thought I hated change.

    Man, I'd love to see everything that you've cut out. There's something so fascinating about peeking into the mind of another writer.

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    1. There really is something fascinating about that...though I fear my mind would be too terrifying for most. :)

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  9. So you ignored your new word processing program and wrote by hand? Curious as to what program you have that still works after almost twenty years.

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    1. No, I transcribed the original document into the new word processing program. I am just realizing now that I didn't make that very clear in my post.

      And I was using Microsoft Word. Still am, just the latest version.

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  10. Congrats on the new tech. I hope you end up loving it so much that you hate to change it in a decade or so :-)

    @mirymom1 from
    Balancing Act

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  11. At least you're writing. I haven't done much of that for the past month and half. My muse seems to have gone on strike.

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    1. Ugh. I hate it when muses go on strike. Hope yours comes back soon!

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  12. At least you're writing… I'm just thinking about writing and not doing anything. Well, except work writing, but board papers aren't really what I love to write.

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    1. But you've also been dealing with selling your house, buying a new house, and moving. That's a pretty time-consuming process, so I think you get a pass. :)

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  13. I'm sure your novel is in there! I have had to go with the throw it against the wall and see what sticks route with my current WIP ... it's very messy, but I think I'm making progress. Of course, the key word her is "think."

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    1. I sure hope there's a novel in there somewhere. I think (see, there's that word again!) it'll be slow-going for a while (a long, long while), but I'll make sense of the madness eventually.

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  14. Don't throw anything at me when I say this but I've come to enjoy change a great deal (she ducks as she types those words). But I still understand those feelings.

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