Friday, October 26, 2012

Friday Feature: Andrew Leon

I have to be out of town today so I am turning My Pet Blog over to the very capable and very talented hands of author and master of allegory, Andrew Leon who deserves a much grander introduction than that.  Hmmm.  Okay...


Imagine the Star Wars theme song blasting through speakers (or an orchestra, your choice) while down an aisle lined with jedi knights doing lightsaber tricks (if there is such a thing) comes today's Special Guest.

And the crowd goes wild.

Take it away, Andrew...

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How Do You Eat Your Serial?


Serials have been out of style for a long time. A really long time. They went from being the way novels were presented in the 19thcentury to fading out almost altogether in the 20th. There have been some experiments with serialization in the last few decades, including one by Stephen King, but they have met with limited success.

However, the rise of the e-book may be changing all of that.

My own interest in doing a serial arose after reading an article from “someone who knows” that you should never ever never do a serialization. For any of you that don't know me, I'm kind of contrary, no, wait, I'm a lot contrary, and my immediate reaction to that was “why not?” Which makes me understand, maybe, why my kids can never just do as their told. I've kind of taught them not to, so, maybe, I shouldn't get so upset when I have to tell them “why” every time I tell them to do something.

Anyway... As I said, serializations used to be the way writing was done, and I couldn't think of any good reason not to try it out. It seemed to me that short bites might be something that today's portable device people would like. Let's just call the whole things an experiment. An interesting experiment. I found out a couple of months into my whole serialization process that Amazon was opening a special serialization arm of their print division, because they see it as a coming thing. Now, I'm not saying a started a bandwagon, but it looks like I was definitely in front of it. Of course, it's too late for me to do Shadow Spinner under the umbrella of Kindle Serials, but I already have an idea for another one that I'll do through their serial branch as soon as I finish this one.

Currently, there are seven chapters of Shadow Spinner available:

Each part is only $0.99 except on the few days each quarter that I'm allowed to make them free.
There is also an accompaniment piece: "The Evil That Men Do

It's not necessary for Shadow Spinner, but it does provide some background.

If you haven't considered serializations before, they may be worth a think. There have certainly been more released this year than in the last couple of decades combined.

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Thanks to Andrew for guest posting today (and raising the IQ level of My Pet Blog to an all time high)!  Be sure to check out his blog and his books.  You won't be disappointed.  Have a great weekend, everyone.

20 comments:

  1. Considering novelettes are now popular, I'd think that would bode well for serializations since it's one story presented as a series of novelettes.

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  2. I have a prequel fantasy novel that I've thought about serializing. Interesting views that might help me decide.

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  3. I may have said this before, but I really think the e-format really lends itself to serialization. It may be that buying stories in chunks small enough to devour over a lunch hour will catch on. I think it's a great idea.

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  4. I'm doing a serial next month. The details will post shortly.

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  5. I have fallen behind on my reading. I will plow through the Shadow Spinner series soon though. I should send you this picture I drew of a bounty hunter standing next to an R2 unit. I was in a particularly "Star Warsian" mood. It's pencil so black and white. But I thought it turned out good.

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  6. Ooh! Another series to add to my already growing TBR pile!

    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com

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  7. Alex: That's kind of the idea. Although some readers like long, in depth books, there is a growing market for shorter works that people can decide to flip through (or whatever) while standing in line somewhere.

    Susan: Well, I hope so, then.

    L.G.: Well, that's what I'm hoping, and, I guess, that's also what Amazon is hoping. And it's not just Amazon. A lot of places are looking at this option.

    PT: Cool!

    Michael: Oh, yeah, I want to see it!

    nutschell: I know what you mean about TBR piles. Mine is teetering!

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  8. And thanks for having me over M.J.! I hope your out-of-town day is something fun!

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  9. I've got to pop over to Amazon Andrew as I don't have the last two installments yet.

    I do agree that serials are a great idea, it's a literary tradition that died out. Time to bring it back.

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  10. Anne: Thanks, Anne! I hope it does come back. The idea of serializations is just fun.

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  11. Thanks for this post, Andrew (and M.J.!). I've been intrigued about a serial format for a while, and have notes on a couple of storylines geared that direction. Thanks for sharing your experience. :)

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  12. Thanks for this post, Andrew (and M.J.!). I've been intrigued about a serial format for a while, and have notes on a couple of storylines geared that direction. Thanks for sharing your experience. :)

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  13. J.R.: Sure thing. I'm sure I'll be talking more about it in the future. ;)

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  14. Isn't it funny how a new technology is bringing back and old form?

    I find that I like getting shorter works for my nook, and I think serializations will take off, because I don't think I'm alone. And if you make the first one free, then you can hook potential readers that might not try the story otherwise.

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  15. Serials do sound like a format a lot of people would be interested in, what with the rise of digital readers and consumer preferences for shorter works.

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  16. Nice post, Andrew! Wasn't Dickens into the serial scene back in the day?

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  17. I will definitely check these out. Serialization is something I hadn't considered before, but it does sound intriguing. Off to investigate...

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  18. Liz: I'd like to make the first several permanently free, but Amazon will only let me have so many free days per quarter.

    Golden: Yeah, some people have been really getting into it. Of course, I've also had some requests to combine the parts into a longer work. heh

    Jess: Yeah, almost everything Dickens wrote was serialized initially.

    Melissa: I hadn't considered it until I read that article saying you shouldn't do it. heh

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  19. I still have two of those serialization attempts on my book shelf. The one from Stephen King and one by...? John Saul, maybe? I'm too lazy to go downstairs and look. Serials are fun, but my trouble is keeping up with them. Remembering to, anyway. Then again, I'm not a portable device kinda' girl. I like the idea of them coming back, but can't guarantee I'd read them, at least not until all the pieces were out.

    And you? Contrary? Certainly not! ;-p

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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  20. Shannon: I'm not certain I'd read one in pieces either, but I also don't have any portable devices. If I did, I might have a different opinion about it. I do know that a lot of people have let me know that they are really enjoying the serial format.

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